Let's talk movie soundtracks

It's Watercooler Wednesday! Join the discussion!

Zimmer_studio95 Who writes your favorite musical score in movies today? There is one person that rises to the top for me...Hans Zimmer.  My all-time favorite movie soundtrack?  Gladiator...no question.  Gladiator is one of the Number 1 selling movie soundtracks of ALL time.  Hans Zimmer is different than most composers , like a Howard Shore or a John Williams...he is very closed off to performing his music in public and very rarely if ever does he conduct.  His background is Rock and Roll (which is why I love him, I'm sure). "I like working in a collaborative way," he says. "I'm not very ego-driven about being 'The Composer.' Whoever brings in great ideas should be welcomed."


Art or Vandalism?

CLICK HERE to watch a video and YOU decide.  Join us at the Watercooler!

For me, I see it as art.   I believe that Banksy challenges us to think and not all art that is sold for millions of dollars in Chelsea and other art houses makes us think.  Art has never fallen within the boundaries of what society says is right or wrong - art is amoral. I know as I watched this clip, I was challenged about my art and whether I do what is safe or do I challenge what is around me.  I like discussion - no, I love discussion...and Banksy has us talking and that is good art.


Watercooler Wednesday - My Favorite Book

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Hands down...Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier. It is a novel filled with fabulous narrative which begins,"Last night, I dreamt I went to Manderly again."  It is a story of deception, love, betrayal, and redemption. The unamed narrator recounts her life living at Manderly as the 2nd wife of Maxim de Winter. It is in her 1st days as his new bride that she discovers there is more to the death o200pxdaphnedumaurier_rebecca_firstf the 1st Mrs. De Winter than she was told.  It is a MUST read that you will not be able to out down.  There are several movie versions but my favorite is the Academy Award winning  1940 Hitchcock version.  This is one of those stories that I know how it ends, but I am still enraptured in reading how it unfolds everytime.